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Deaf woman hopes to earn pilot’s license through scholarship program

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One deaf California woman with a passion for the high skies hopes to earn her pilot’s license next month through a special program at Purdue University Airport.

As Julia Velasquez prepares to take the test for the coveted license in July, she says the seven-week opportunity, made possible through a scholarship, is a dream come true.

“Ever since I was little, I have always been fascinated by the sky. I’ve always wanted to fly,” Velasquez said through an interrupter, Fox 59 reports.

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“There’s a lot of teamwork,” Velasquez said. “A lot of communication.”

 (Fox 59/WTTV VIA NNS)

The ninth annual Able Flight scholarship program funds pilot lessons for individuals with physical disabilities, and is hosted in West Lafayette, Ind. Velasquez is one of four students in the program this summer, and all are eager to hopefully earn their licenses within the next few weeks.

“We can do the same things as everybody else,” Velasquez said. “We want to be equal. We want to come up with creative solutions to make it work.”

To that end, though most of the Purdue flight instructors are not trained in sign language, they are embracing creativity in instructing the students.

“I didn’t know any sign language when I first met Julia,” instructor Andrea Hynek, a rising Purdue senior, told Fox 59. “I wanted to communicate with her as best as I can, so I learned the [alphabet] and that helps a lot.”

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From spelling out words to Velasquez or writing down instructions, Hynek and Velasquez have established multiple methods of successful discussion from takeoff to landing.

“There’s a lot of teamwork,” Velasquez said. “A lot of communication.”

After hopefully earning her pilot’s license, Velasquez says her next dream is become an astronaut. In the meantime, she hopes to help other deaf individuals earn their pilot’s licenses, as well.

According to the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, there are currently about 200 deaf pilots across the country, Fox 59 reports.

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Janine Puhak is an editor for Fox News Lifestyle. Follow her on Twitter at @JaninePuhak





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Schools aren’t doing enough to prepare children for modern collaborative working finds UC EXPO study

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UC EXPO study finds 55% of Brits see education system as one of the major blockades in enabling collaboration in the workplace

LONDON, UK. 07 March – New research from UC EXPO, Europe’s largest unified communications & collaboration (UC&C) event, has found that 56% of working Brits don’t think the current school curriculum does enough to provide students with the collaboration skills they need for modern working.

UC Social

UC Social

The results come at a time when collaboration is regularly noted as a vital aspect of work and organisations are doubling down on how to enable smarter collaboration amongst the workforce. Indeed 70% of the UK workforce believe that collaboration is very important in the work environment.

But just over half (51%) either never collaborated or collaborated infrequently in school, and 37% stated that collaboration wasn’t an important focus of their education. In fact 55% of people working in education also believe that not enough is done to provide students with collaboration skills, with one teacher noting: “The emphasis is on learning facts and passing exams rather than allowing for development of skills such as group work or team work which help with other skills. The last National Curriculum was purely skills based and went too far, this is the other extreme. I do try to include more group and team work as it makes a more resilient and independent worker, but the kids prefer to be told.”

It’s somewhat unsurprising, given the lack of collaboration emphasis in school, that 10% of Brits admit that they never collaborate in their work and that 5% will actively try to avoid collaborating. 15% state that one of the reasons they don’t like to collaborate is because they believe it’s a waste of time.

But, as individuals rise through the ranks collaboration becomes a more frequent and important aspect of their role. 83% of C-level executives who responded to the study stated that they collaborate very frequently in their role, compared with only 47% of entry level staff.

However, tides could be starting to turn as younger generations in the workplace are more likely to have had a collaborative education than older generations, with 71% of 18-24 year olds collaborating often in school, compared with just 24% of 55-64 year olds.

“Collaboration skills are regularly noted as vital on job adverts, and as a key contributor to an organisation’s productivity and creativity. Without collaboration some of the most innovative technology of our time simply wouldn’t exist and society wouldn’t be driving forwards in the way it is,” comments Bradley Maule-ffinch, EMEA Portfolio Director for UC EXPO.

Maule-ffinch continues: “For a long time technology was noted, perhaps misguidedly, as an inhibitor to collaboration. But given the huge range of products now available to support and enable collaboration, only 7% of working Brits believe that’s still the case. This points to a far deeper collaboration issue within workplaces. If organisations can work together with those in education to emphasise the collaboration skills individuals need when they enter the workplace then future workforces are going to be able to thrive.”

To find out more about how you can enable smarter, easier, collaboration in your organisations register free for UC EXPO 2018, taking place on 16-17 May 2018 at ExCeL London. To register please visit: www.ucexpo.co.uk. Get involved on Twitter using the #UCEXPO hashtag.

This research was conducted among 2000 individuals in full and part time employment by 3Gem in February 2018

About UC EXPO
UC EXPO is Europe’s largest unified communications & collaboration (UC&C) event, for those looking to find out how the latest unified communications can drive and support their business. The event showcases brand new exclusive content and senior level insights from across the industry. UC EXPO 2018, together with and the world’s largest UC&C LinkedIn group delivers news, insight and knowledge throughout the year. Attending UC EXPO 2018 will help to ensure business decisions are made based on the latest best practice for improved communications and collaboration whilst allowing organisations to continue or start their journey in enabling workforce mobility. The 2018 event will bring together 6,500 ICT professionals, 100 specialist suppliers and world class exclusive education through 100 free to attend seminars.

Media contacts:
Gemma Smith / Marnie Spicer
020 3176 4700
ucexpo@kaizo.co.uk

Speaker or exhibitor enquiries:
Aaron Levy / Keiran Prior
0203 841 8500





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Watch Moderat Perform “Bad Kingdom” Live

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Attendees of Coachella’s Weekend 2 gathered together to participate in the festival’s own March For Science, an international series of walks and protests regarding the lack of government action toward combating pollution and climate change.

The march was led by band Downtown Boys after performing a 3:10 p.m. set atop the newly added Sonora Stage. According to the Desert Sun, the march began at the Sonora Stage and made its way to the Chiaozza Garden. The crowd was speckled with hand-drawn signage, including the words “Science is real” and “evidence over ignorance.”

Joe DeGeorge, the band’s saxophonist and synth player, explained the group’s reasoning for spearheading Coachella’s iteration of the Science March.

ll over the country, people are marching for science, and we’re doing our march here at Coachella. It’s not just about marching for a fact-based ideology; it’s about power and how the institution and structure that runs this country really value private wealth and capital above things like our health, our environment. We are marching because we value those things and we have to shout in this capitalist structure to make our values heard.

Coachella attendees joined hundreds of organized marches across the nation in the name of science and governmental responsibility.

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Attendees of Coachella’s Weekend 2 gathered together to participate in the festival’s own March For Science, an international series of walks and protests regarding the lack of government action toward combating pollution and climate change.

The march was led by band Downtown Boys after performing a 3:10 p.m. set atop the newly added Sonora Stage. According to the Desert Sun, the march began at the Sonora Stage and made its way to the Chiaozza Garden. The crowd was speckled with hand-drawn signage, including the words “Science is real” and “evidence over ignorance.”

Joe DeGeorge, the band’s saxophonist and synth player, explained the group’s reasoning for spearheading Coachella’s iteration of the Science March.

ll over the country, people are marching for science, and we’re doing our march here at Coachella. It’s not just about marching for a fact-based ideology; it’s about power and how the institution and structure that runs this country really value private wealth and capital above things like our health, our environment. We are marching because we value those things and we have to shout in this capitalist structure to make our values heard.

Coachella attendees joined hundreds of organized marches across the nation in the name of science and governmental responsibility.

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0

Attendees of Coachella’s Weekend 2 gathered together to participate in the festival’s own March For Science, an international series of walks and protests regarding the lack of government action toward combating pollution and climate change.

The march was led by band Downtown Boys after performing a 3:10 p.m. set atop the newly added Sonora Stage. According to the Desert Sun, the march began at the Sonora Stage and made its way to the Chiaozza Garden. The crowd was speckled with hand-drawn signage, including the words “Science is real” and “evidence over ignorance.”

Joe DeGeorge, the band’s saxophonist and synth player, explained the group’s reasoning for spearheading Coachella’s iteration of the Science March.

ll over the country, people are marching for science, and we’re doing our march here at Coachella. It’s not just about marching for a fact-based ideology; it’s about power and how the institution and structure that runs this country really value private wealth and capital above things like our health, our environment. We are marching because we value those things and we have to shout in this capitalist structure to make our values heard.

Coachella attendees joined hundreds of organized marches across the nation in the name of science and governmental responsibility.

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0

Attendees of Coachella’s Weekend 2 gathered together to participate in the festival’s own March For Science, an international series of walks and protests regarding the lack of government action toward combating pollution and climate change.

The march was led by band Downtown Boys after performing a 3:10 p.m. set atop the newly added Sonora Stage. According to the Desert Sun, the march began at the Sonora Stage and made its way to the Chiaozza Garden. The crowd was speckled with hand-drawn signage, including the words “Science is real” and “evidence over ignorance.”

Joe DeGeorge, the band’s saxophonist and synth player, explained the group’s reasoning for spearheading Coachella’s iteration of the Science March.

ll over the country, people are marching for science, and we’re doing our march here at Coachella. It’s not just about marching for a fact-based ideology; it’s about power and how the institution and structure that runs this country really value private wealth and capital above things like our health, our environment. We are marching because we value those things and we have to shout in this capitalist structure to make our values heard.

Coachella attendees joined hundreds of organized marches across the nation in the name of science and governmental responsibility.

Rita Ora Teases New Song With Marshmello

0

Attendees of Coachella’s Weekend 2 gathered together to participate in the festival’s own March For Science, an international series of walks and protests regarding the lack of government action toward combating pollution and climate change.

The march was led by band Downtown Boys after performing a 3:10 p.m. set atop the newly added Sonora Stage. According to the Desert Sun, the march began at the Sonora Stage and made its way to the Chiaozza Garden. The crowd was speckled with hand-drawn signage, including the words “Science is real” and “evidence over ignorance.”

Joe DeGeorge, the band’s saxophonist and synth player, explained the group’s reasoning for spearheading Coachella’s iteration of the Science March.

ll over the country, people are marching for science, and we’re doing our march here at Coachella. It’s not just about marching for a fact-based ideology; it’s about power and how the institution and structure that runs this country really value private wealth and capital above things like our health, our environment. We are marching because we value those things and we have to shout in this capitalist structure to make our values heard.

Coachella attendees joined hundreds of organized marches across the nation in the name of science and governmental responsibility.

Big Sean’s “Bounce Back” Certified Double Platinum

0

Attendees of Coachella’s Weekend 2 gathered together to participate in the festival’s own March For Science, an international series of walks and protests regarding the lack of government action toward combating pollution and climate change.

The march was led by band Downtown Boys after performing a 3:10 p.m. set atop the newly added Sonora Stage. According to the Desert Sun, the march began at the Sonora Stage and made its way to the Chiaozza Garden. The crowd was speckled with hand-drawn signage, including the words “Science is real” and “evidence over ignorance.”

Joe DeGeorge, the band’s saxophonist and synth player, explained the group’s reasoning for spearheading Coachella’s iteration of the Science March.

ll over the country, people are marching for science, and we’re doing our march here at Coachella. It’s not just about marching for a fact-based ideology; it’s about power and how the institution and structure that runs this country really value private wealth and capital above things like our health, our environment. We are marching because we value those things and we have to shout in this capitalist structure to make our values heard.

Coachella attendees joined hundreds of organized marches across the nation in the name of science and governmental responsibility.

Nine Inch Nails Remix Todd Rundrgen’s ‘Deaf Ears’

0

Attendees of Coachella’s Weekend 2 gathered together to participate in the festival’s own March For Science, an international series of walks and protests regarding the lack of government action toward combating pollution and climate change.

The march was led by band Downtown Boys after performing a 3:10 p.m. set atop the newly added Sonora Stage. According to the Desert Sun, the march began at the Sonora Stage and made its way to the Chiaozza Garden. The crowd was speckled with hand-drawn signage, including the words “Science is real” and “evidence over ignorance.”

Joe DeGeorge, the band’s saxophonist and synth player, explained the group’s reasoning for spearheading Coachella’s iteration of the Science March.

ll over the country, people are marching for science, and we’re doing our march here at Coachella. It’s not just about marching for a fact-based ideology; it’s about power and how the institution and structure that runs this country really value private wealth and capital above things like our health, our environment. We are marching because we value those things and we have to shout in this capitalist structure to make our values heard.

Coachella attendees joined hundreds of organized marches across the nation in the name of science and governmental responsibility.

Music Hubs Receive £300 Million Boost

0

Attendees of Coachella’s Weekend 2 gathered together to participate in the festival’s own March For Science, an international series of walks and protests regarding the lack of government action toward combating pollution and climate change.

The march was led by band Downtown Boys after performing a 3:10 p.m. set atop the newly added Sonora Stage. According to the Desert Sun, the march began at the Sonora Stage and made its way to the Chiaozza Garden. The crowd was speckled with hand-drawn signage, including the words “Science is real” and “evidence over ignorance.”

Joe DeGeorge, the band’s saxophonist and synth player, explained the group’s reasoning for spearheading Coachella’s iteration of the Science March.

ll over the country, people are marching for science, and we’re doing our march here at Coachella. It’s not just about marching for a fact-based ideology; it’s about power and how the institution and structure that runs this country really value private wealth and capital above things like our health, our environment. We are marching because we value those things and we have to shout in this capitalist structure to make our values heard.

Coachella attendees joined hundreds of organized marches across the nation in the name of science and governmental responsibility.

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